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Housing

Minimum standards for residential and rental accommodations are defined in the Neighbourhood Liveability By-law

Frequently Asked Questions

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I have a problem in the suite or home that I rent.  What can be done about concerns inside and outside (relating to floors, walls, ceilings, windows, doors, toilets, sinks, furnace, water, hot water, roof, eavestroughing, plumbing, sewer, yard, fence, accessory buildings, porch, stairs, foundation, exterior walls)?
  • Various City of Winnipeg By-laws require properties be maintained to minimum standards, including all buildings, fences, yards and accessory buildings. If you have problems related to your rental residence first contact your rental manager, owner, or caretaker to advise them of the problem. If the problem is not resolved you can register a complaint with the City of Winnipeg Community By-law Enforcement Services at 311.
I have a concern with a property in my neighbourhood. The residents are not looking after their property and it is full of junk.  Can something be done?
  • The City will investigate any complaint regarding living conditions inside a home, as well as yard conditions.  Contact 311 to register a complaint.
I am concerned about a friend/neighbour/relative that is hoarding all sorts of junk and material in their house and/or yard. What should I do?
  • The City will investigate any complaint regarding living conditions inside a home, as well as yard conditions. Contact 311 to register a complaint. The following resources and agencies may be of assistance:
Will the City inspect my home or a home I intend to purchase because I suspect there is mould or an air quality problem?
  • The City of Winnipeg does not conduct any air quality testing.  You must contact an “Environmental Consultant” or a “Home Inspection Service”, both of which are listed in the phone book or online.
I received a deficiency order from the City, what do I need to do? Who can I speak to?  How can I appeal? How can I get more time to deal with repairs?
  • The deficiency order is sent out as the result of a complaint investigation concerning your property.  The order outlines in detail specific issues that require corrective action be taken.
  • To speak to someone about your deficiency order, check the deficiency order, just a few lines under the compliance date, for the contact information (name, phone number, email address) of the inspector/by-law enforcement officer that issued the order. 
  • The appeal process details are listed at the bottom of the deficiency order. Appeals must be made prior to the compliance date on the order or within 14 days (whichever is sooner) and are subject to an administrative fee.
How long does it take for an inspection after a complaint is made?
  • The time it takes to complete an inspection will depend on the nature of the complaint however most inspections will be completed within 10 business days. The inspector is not required to make an appointment, but may contact the complainant for further information or to make an appointment for an inspection.
My neighbours eavestroughing downspout is directed toward my house and it is causing water to get into my basement.  How should the downspout be directed?
  • The eavestroughing downspouts from any building should drain in such a way that it does not affect neighbouring properties or buildings.  The downspouts can be directed parallel to the property line and the lot level should contain the water so that it remains within your own property. Also see Flooding/Lot Grading/Downspouts.