Site Accessibility Information Access Key 1 to Skip to Top Navigation Access Key 2 to Skip to the Three One One link Access Key 3 to Skip to City of Winnipeg Main Menu Access Key 4 to Skip to Left Navigation Menu Access Key 5 to Skip to Content area Access Key 6 to Skip to Right Sidebar content area Access Key 7 to Skip to Footer Links
City of Winnipeg
|  Link to the City of Winnipeg French websiteFrançais  |
Until Election Day
on October 24
Citizens Information Service

Public Works

Walk Bike Projects

Adjustable Bike Lane Curbs

Construction

Update July 2018 – The pilot is complete. Visit the Findings & Adjustments tab for more information about pilot results and next steps in implementing adjustable bike lane curbs beyond the pilot.

Starting the week of August 21, 2017, the City of Winnipeg ran a nine-month technical trial of adjustable bike lane curbs on existing bike lanes. The trial included testing installation methods, monitoring maintenance including snow clearing and spring clean-up, and comfort level of users. The goal of the trial was to explore the feasibility of adjustable bike lane curbs as a method for deploying protected bike lanes. Adjustable bike lane curbs will allow the City to install protected bike lanes, while still being able to adjust the design of the lane if necessary to accommodate feedback from users and other stakeholders, as well as future changes in use of the roadway.

The curb trials were installed on existing bike lanes at:

  • Sherbrook Street south of Cumberland Avenue;
  • Bannatyne Avenue between King Street and Albert Street.

Background

The City evaluated two types of adjustable curbs as part of this pilot project to observe which performed better.

Precast curb with “U” shaped drainage channels

TYPE #1 – Precast curb with "U" shaped drainage channels

This type of adjustable curb is constructed with drainage channels to allow rain water to easily pass through to curb inlets and catch basins for drainage. This type of curb sections can be butted tightly together for a uniform look which aids in resisting lateral forces, from errant vehicles or snow clearing equipment.

Solid precast curb

TYPE #2 – Solid precast curb

This type of adjustable curb is constructed as a solid section with no drainage channels. These solid sections of curb are installed with three inch spaces in between to allow for rain water to drain to curb inlets and catch basins.

Engage

A public engagement report is now available under the documents tab. Thank you to the 347 people who provided feedback through an online survey available on this project page between August 21, 2017 and June 1, 2018.

The survey heard from 107 people who came across the pilot project while driving, 209 who came across the project while biking, and 31 people who came across the project while walking.

In both pilot locations (Sherbrook Street and Bannatyne Avenue), respondents using all modes of transportation (driving, cycling, and walking) expressed increased comfort when passing through areas with adjustable curbs.

Further analysis of what we heard and how it was considered is now available in a public engagement report under the documents tab.

Findings & Adjustments

Installation:

Installation confirmed that these adjustable bike lane curbs will allow the City to install protected bike lanes more quickly, while still being able to adjust the design of the lane to accommodate feedback from users and stakeholders, as well as future changes in land use and use of the roadway.

Curb Design:

Two curb types were tested for drainage and durability (more information available in the background tab), one with drainage channels within the curb structure and one that is a solid curb, spaced to accommodate drainage between curbs. The preferred curb includes drainage channels. Based on the trial findings, the City has made slight modifications to the shape of the curb to include a 50mm angled cut at the ends of each unit. This design modification improves on the durability of the curbs.

Curb design

Maintenance:

During the pilot of the adjustable bike lanes, Winnipeg experienced a snow event that had 25cm of snowfall accumulation that buried the curbs. As a result, the plow crew had difficulty locating this infrastructure at the Sherbrook Street trial location, and the adjustable curb was damaged. The City's practice has been to remove polyposts during winter months so that they do not get damaged. Posts remained adhered to the curbs for the duration of the trial at the Bannatyne Avenue location and the curbs were not damaged during the heavy snow event.

As a winter city we are always monitoring new inventory related to our snow clearing operations. For future installations, we will make adjustments to the current method of installation to improve the curb visibility during snow events and ensure that deployment is consistent throughout the cycling infrastructure. Major intersections will include bullnoses with signage to enable the maintenance crew to see where the adjustable curbs begin. Improved visibility of the curbs during heavy snow conditions will require polyposts to be installed with the curbs. The polyposts will be installed consistently and maintained year round where adjustable curbs are installed.

Polypost

Comfort level of users:

The survey heard from 107 people who came across the pilot project while driving, 209 who came across the project while biking, and 31 people who came across the project while walking.

In both pilot locations (Sherbrook Street and Bannatyne Avenue), respondents using all modes of transportation (driving, cycling and walking) expressed increased comfort when passing through areas with adjustable curbs.

Further analysis of what we heard and how it was considered is now available in a public engagement report under the documents tab.

Next Steps:

The City has gathered feedback for consideration and incorporation in future projects where adjustable methods of protected bike lanes will be studied, designed and implemented. Findings from the technical trial informed adjustments to the design of the pre-cast curb units and the ongoing maintenance of the protected cycling infrastructure using pre-cast curbs.

In 2018, the City's West Alexander to East Exchange Corridor project will incorporate adjustable bike lane curbs. More information about the project is available on the project webpage. The City will continue to collect feedback from stakeholders and the public so that ongoing adjustments can be made as necessary.

Feedback can be sent to 311.

Documents

Document Name Date Type
Public Engagement Report 2018-05-28 Report

Frequently Asked Questions

Open all | Close all

Why is the adjustable bike curb trial being undertaken?
The purpose of the trial is to monitor curb performance through all seasons, monitor users' comfort levels, assess installation methods, and determine a cost effective durable standard product.
How long will the adjustable bike curb trial continue?
The project will start in August and continue through the winter and spring to determine how the curbs perform in multiple seasons. The City will be monitoring the project and gathering feedback for a period of about nine months.
How can I provide feedback on the adjustable bike lane curbs?
An online survey was available to give feedback on how citizens felt about the adjustable bike lane curbs. Those wishing to provide feedback can also contact the city via email pilotproject@winnipeg.ca and 311.
Why is the adjustable bike curb trial only being done in two small sections of roadway?
The trial is being undertaken on a limited scale to determine feasibility before possibly making a larger investment and expanding the use of adjustable bike lane curbs.
What is the benefit of an adjustable curb?
Adjustable bike lane curbs are being explored because they will allow the City to implement protected bike lanes with the potential to adjust the design of the lane to accommodate feedback from users and other stakeholders as well as to accommodate changes in land use.
How is an adjustable bike lane curb different from other types of protected bike lanes?
Adjustable methods can be more cost effective and a faster way to create a protected bike lane. Rather than constructing a permanent curb into the road (as with Assiniboine bike lane), the curb is anchored to the road surface using steel pins. This method does not require a complete road renewal to implement as with permanent lanes and can be adjusted more easily.
Will this affect parking or loading zones in the adjustable bike curb trial area?
There is no anticipated impact to parking or loading zones in the trial areas.
What are the costs associated with the trial?
The costs are expected to be about $15,000. There may be additional costs related to maintenance that would also be monitored as part of this trial.

Study Area Maps


Adjustable Bike Lane Curbs

Area map

Last update: July 30, 2018