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News Releases

News Releases
December 3, 2008

Great Horned Owl Recovers from Encounter with Soccer Net
Score ready to be released back into the wild
 Released: 8:40 a.m.

NEWS @ A GLANCE:

Score, a Great Horned Owl, who was rescued from entanglement in a soccer net at Acadia School in September, has recovered and is now ready to be released this week. (for more details, please read the full media release below)

WINNIPEG - December 3, 2008 – Score, a Great Horned Owl, who was rescued from entanglement in a soccer net at Acadia School in September, has recovered and is now ready to be released this week.

The young owl was pursuing a rabbit when he became entangled in the school’s soccer net, hence the name “Score.”  In a state of shock, and with his wing injured, the bird was extricated by staff of the Assiniboine Park Zoo and taken to the Zoo Hospital for examination and x-rays.  He was later transferred to the Wildlife Haven where he responded well to rehabilitation of his injured wing muscles.  

Staff of the Wildlife Haven and Assiniboine Park Zoo Hospital will release the owl at 1:30 p.m. on Wednesday, December 3, 2008, on its home territory – Acadia School, 175 Killarney Avenue in Fort Garry.


Related Links
Assiniboine Park Zoo
 
Corporate Communications
 

Pedestrian Accommodation at Signalized Intersections
 Released: 12:00 p.m.

NEWS @ A GLANCE:

The Manitoba Human Rights Commission and the City of Winnipeg have agreed upon a negotiated settlement which will benefit people with disabilities, by improving accessibility and ease of crossing at controlled intersections, providing for a long-term plan to ensure that all Winnipeg intersections are more accessible within the next 15 years, with all downtown intersections more accessible in 10 years.  (for more details, please read the full media release below)

WINNIPEG - December 3, 2008 – The Manitoba Human Rights Commission and the City of Winnipeg have agreed upon a negotiated settlement which will benefit people with disabilities, by improving accessibility and ease of crossing at controlled intersections.

The agreement, which was developed in response to a complaint to the Manitoba Human Rights Commission by Winnipeggers Ainley Bridgeman and David Martin, provides for a long-term plan to ensure that all Winnipeg intersections are more accessible within the next 15 years, with all downtown intersections more accessible in 10 years.  

In response to this agreement, Ms. Bridgeman said, “I am very pleased with this settlement,” adding, “This is a positive step forward, and it will make a huge difference for people with disabilities.” The other complainant, David Martin, agreed, saying, “This change benefits everyone, also making it easier for those without disabilities.”

Mayor Sam Katz observed, “This agreement is very much in keeping with the City’s Universal Design Policy, and our ongoing efforts to make Winnipeg more accessible for everyone.” He added, “As Mayor, I’m committed to a City that’s accountable to all its citizens, and accessibility is a key part of that accountability.”

Although the complaints which led to this settlement were filed by two individuals, the Manitoba Human Rights Commission identified this as a systemic concern which affected many people, who have not been able to cross a street safely or get around freely.

In the complaints it was stated that, due to visual and physical disabilities, people:

  • cannot see the visual “Walk/Don’t Walk” signal;
  • cannot find, push, and hold down the button used to turn on many audible or visual “Walk/Don’t Walk” signals.

Highlights of the settlement are:

  • All intersections with traffic signals will have accessible pedestrian signals.
  • The accessible signals will be in place within 10 years downtown, and within 15 years outside the downtown.
  • Most pushbuttons downtown, and some outside the downtown, will be removed within the next three years.
  • The pushbuttons currently in use, which presently must be pressed for three seconds to activate the Accessible Pedestrian Signal, are being reconfigured to activate immediately. All pushbuttons should be reconfigured by the end of 2009.
  • The City is committed to testing alternative practical technologies to pushbuttons, with a view to adopting a practical alternative if one becomes available.
  • A Consultation Team of representatives from the Manitoba Human Rights Commission, community representatives, City of Winnipeg and independent engineers, and City of Winnipeg accessibility representatives will meet annually.
  • The Consultation Team will deal with issues such as technology, and prioritization of intersections for Accessible Pedestrian Signals.
  • The City of Winnipeg has committed to provide a regular progress report on this issue.

Related Links
Corporate Communications
 
Last update: 03.12.2008

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